Official Global Missions Haiti/Afghanistan Update


Photo taken by Gabrielle Latortue


“… open our hearts, open our hands …”

The Rev. Dr. D.B. Cannon, Executive Director of the Department of Global Missions and Editor in Chief for the Missionary Seer possesses a special lens which qualifies him to give sound leadership to the A.M.E. Zion Church with regards to our relief efforts in Haiti and our awareness of the crisis unfolding in Afghanistan. Please take a brief moment to view the heartfelt appeal from Dr. Cannon himself.



Haiti is one of 2 Caribbean nations (Dominican Republic, the other nation) on the western part of the island of Hispaniola. It is an independent nation about the size of the state of Maryland with about 11 million populates. On August 14, 2021, Haiti experienced a 7.2 magnitude earthquake leaving at least 2,200 people dead, more than 12,000 injured, some 300 still missing and many displaced. Haiti is still trying to recover from the devastation of the, the 2010 7.0 magnitude earthquake, the Coronavirus pandemic, this year’s earthquake with a residue of destroyed buildings, blocked roads and the continued threats from tropical storms.



The African Methodist Episcopal Zion Church, specifically the North Eastern Episcopal District (with Bishop Dennis V. Proctor, presiding & Pastor Nicolle D. Harris, who has direct contact with relief agencies in Haiti) and The Department of Global Missions (with Bishop Kenneth Monroe as Chairman & Dr. D. B. Cannon as Executive Director) have joined in the effort to offer relief to those who are hurting, hungering and hoping. All who wish to make contributions in support of this effort may do so by donating to the Global Missions Department of the A.M.E. Zion Church Givelify



Photo : US Marine Service



Afghanistan emerged as a significant U.S. foreign policy concern in 2001, when the United States, in response to the terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001, led a military campaign against Al Qaeda and the Afghan Taliban government that harbored and supported it. In the intervening 19 years, the United States has suffered over 22,000 military casualties (including around 2,400 fatalities) in Afghanistan and Congress has appropriated approximately $144 billion for reconstruction and security forces there. In that time, an elected Afghan government has replaced the Taliban; improvement in most measures of human development is limited; and future prospects of gains remain mixed. [i] The Taliban is regaining control in Afghanistan following the U.S. military withdrawal, families are in urgent and immediate danger. Attacks from the Taliban on Afghan nationals who supported the U.S. mission have increased. The U.S. government promised to protect them and are now working to bring them to safety by granting priority access to the U.S. Refugee Admissions Program and providing Special Immigrant Visas — a visa category created and allocated by Congress to ensure that no U.S. ally would be left in danger.



The A.M.E. Zion Church takes seriously It’s identity as The Freedom Church; and to quote Dr. Cannon’ “stands in solidarity with organizations all over the world” to help those adversely impacted by the escalating conflict in Afghanistan. The A.M.E. Zion Church is one of 37 Faith Communions standing in solidarity with the advocating voice of Church World Service. Since 2009 CWS has resettled more than 7,000 Afghan SIV recipients and their families to safety in the United States. There are currently 18,000 Afghan SIV applicants who are in desperate need of immediate resettlement to the United States along with their families.



Willing Donors may contribute to support refugees and asylum seekers by going to our Givelify at Global Missions Department of The A.M.E. Zion Church…select the amount you wish to donate...then select Afghan Support. These funds will be sent directly to Church World Service to assist in resettling those displaced.


To learn about sponsoring a family arriving in your community, email refugeewelcome@cwsglobal.org

[i] Afghanistan: Background & U.S. Policy Brief June 12, 2021 Congressional Research Service